Category Archives: Knowledge

Quotes on Knowledge or knowledgeable quotes on technology, ubiquitous computing, science, universal design, UX, user interface design, user experience and human computer interaction

How to control a society?

How to control a society?

– Put basic human needs at threat.
– Tire them out as they try to fulfill these needs.
– Make them stupid.

1. USER EXPERIENCE CONTROL VIA CAPITALISM
The user experience of an average citizen living in a capitalist society is broken. Most working class folks are tried, deprived of sleep and sex.

If you’re not well rested, healthy or deprived of your basic human needs because of spending all your time to earn money to pay rent – your experience of human life is broken.

Promote drugs like sugar/coffee/alcohol to escape or keep up with reality.

2. KNOWLEDGE CONTROL VIA INFORMATION
If we are outputs of the information we consume and the experiences we have; I sometimes feel that we live in the age of stupid.

The information we consume junk. Distractification created by information warfare between countries and corporates – run by those who can buy the most amount of media.

7 things to do

12 things you don’t know about…

You won’t believe what this girl did in this video

Russia/ISIS/N.Korea is preparing…

Dumb f*cking content created for the sake of pageviews to sell some shitty product or propaganda.

The real information is censored or not accessible. Knowledge seekers are punished – death/prison to political bloggers and activists.

Information without credibility or quality makes us all stupid.

CONCLUSION:
The tired, the deprived and the stupid will NEVER revolt and will do as told

A though experiment on Information Access

Thought experiments for the intelligent ones…

Experiment A
Let’s say I take 9-11 million people with from one continent (con-A) and shift them to another continent (con-B)

In this new continent I teach them how to speak in Ubrindi. I also teach them how to clean, cook, knit, stitch and farm.

I never teach them how to write or read books in Urbindi. This continues for their children and their grand children and so on for a couple of hundred years.

Question 1: Will selective access to information for a couple hundred years; create massive gaps in socio-economic status between the two groups for centuries to follow?
____________________________________________________

Experiment B
Let’s say I go to about 40-50 countries that speak an aggregate of about 1600-2000 languages. I make up a new rule – to access any well paid job – you need read/speak/write Urbindi.

Access to decent quality education is only available in Urbinidi.

This rule continues for 200-250 years.

Question 2: Could it be possible that this preferential access to information (via the Urbinidi medium) would destroy hundreds on languages in centuries to come?
____________________________________________________

Experiment C
Let’s say I win the elections in a country called Anataria. I soon pass a law that restricts all external media – via TV, Internet, Radio etc.

Anyone who consumes news/information from sources that aren’t approved by the Government of Anataria gets arrested.

This law continues for a few decades.

Question 3: Can it be possible by imposing restriction to access information; I create a country of people completely unaware of the outside reality?
____________________________________________________

Experiment D
In the year 2050, and let’s assume everything we buy is online by then, I will go to 35 countries and allow them to download stuff but not upload.

You can download at 10MBps and upload at 24kbps.

People can watch/consume/download videos/files/etc but can upload only text – no videos, files, data etc.

Question 4: What will happen when I restrict information access in this way?
____________________________________________________

Cases A, B and C have observable data.

But what do you think will be the outcome for experiment D – and the future of these 35 countries?

What is HCI: Final Thoughts on the program at TLU

I can’t believe it’s final semester at Tallinn University as I am about to graduate as an MSC in Human Computer Interaction. I mean, hopefully. I still have huge research thesis to write.

“So, what it Human Computer Interaction?”

People have been asking me this question for over a year now and it gets harder to explain. In most study fields: The More You Learn = The more you know

You see, the way HCI is works is somewhat like this: The More You learn = The More You Understand how you don’t understand anything; that you’re a complete stupid moron and you should quit ICT and find a different carrier path like start a cafe or a bar on a nice sunny beach in Gulf of Thailand.

Over the past 3 semesters I have been asked this questions so many times! Here are some of the ways I answered people as to what is HCI.

what is hci

Anyway, here’s a small recommendation to the new students who have joined into HCI. I absolutely recommend the following courses:

  1. Philosophy of HCI – What is the point of technology? Seriously, have you ever thought about it? What is technology supposed to do for us? We live in a Black Mirrored society where people spend more time on their apps than their loved ones. Its ignorant designers like us that do not see the long term effects of the things we create.
  2. Interaction Design – I guarantee you, if you’re not completely stupid and just attend every class, that this course make you one of the finest app and website maker. Forget that, you will learn how to make ANYTHING you want. Better. It will help you understand ‘people before-during-and-after design’.
  3. Evaluation of UX – Because they give you really cool tech stuff that you can hook up to your brains and monitor activity. Trust me, its so much fun!
  4. Game Design – Everything can be turned into a game. Even your studies! Very imaginative and fun. You don’t feel like you’re studying!
  5. Web Workshop – Don’t miss this! It’s too much fun not to.
  6. Design 4 All – Want know how to be a stupid designer? Lack empathy. The course tells you how society designs in a way that we forget to include people who of weaker sections of society. This course will expand your mind in ways you cannot imagine. Highly recommended.

A quick feedback on some of the compulsory courses and how to deal with them:

  1. Introduction to HCI – By now, if you haven’t learned how to make concept maps and mind maps you should quit studying HCI. Seriously, find another masters – may be International Relations. I loved this course. What’s funny is that I remember feeling super smart and super stupid after every class. I think that’s a good sign.
  2. Research Methods – I know this one is early in the morning but do not sleep through it. I made the mistake of not being attentive in one of the classes and my final semester thesis is a lot more difficult now. I am spending way more time on basic stuff like formatting than I should. RM is perfect to train you how to research and write.
  3. Developing Interactive Systems – Keep yourself absolutely 100% free during this intense course and you might just pass!
  4. Project Management in Software Engineering – If you ever want to be rich or get money for your ideas in life, you CANNOT ignore this course.

I am very grateful to Estonia’s educational systems. I knew it would be good but I never had an idea that it was world class for IT.

My suggestions for future classes? Focus more on HCI4D. HCI4D stands for Human Computer Interaction for Development. There are some wonderful things going on in the world that you need to be aware about as technologists. I am going to give you a simple example on how HCI4D can make you brilliant designer.

 

Language litreracy is another percieved barrier to Internet. According to Kentaro Toyama, in an article called Human-Computer Interaction and Global Development, he presents the case study of mPesa in Kenya which challenges the current percived notion that literacy is needed for technological adoption. mPesa is a mobile based banking system in Kenya with 17+ million number of users that use their regular mobile phones to send money to each other (Safaricom: mPesa Timeline, 2013). A huge chunk of these users are illiterate and cannot read and write however mPesa boasts of billions of transactions every month. This has made researchers and designers fundamentaly question language literacy as a barrier in technology adoption (Toyama, 2010).

This is amazing, isn’t it? Millions of people in the world cannot read and write but they can use computers and technology. Who knew?

Human beings are smart and our brain is unique. This course teaches you that. This course teaches you limited we are as human beings and how unlimited we can be we use our technological resources wisely.

We need to think of a way we can design solutions that connects us no matter what section of society we come from.

One of the quotes I will always remember that I was told by my professor:

“A designer and an illustrator are two different things. A designer is a futurer. One who see multiple futures; multiple users in multiple contexts experiencing multiple artefacts in multiple environments. He then designs…”

So, what am I going to do next with all the awesome things I learned at TLU?

Start my thesis work in India.

I wish all my colleagues, professors and wonderful friends that I encountered in Tallinn all the very best. I am going to miss this wonderful university life in this awesome (and freakishly cold) country!

 

 

 

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone and as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

– Marianne Williamson

… the human interface of some software applications  gives the impression that the designer’s model of the user was a 25-year-old male with a doctorate in computer science who is besotted with technology and is more interested in playing with a computer than in completing useful job of work!

– Alistair D. N. Edwards

E-commerce is one of the most visible examples of the way in which information and communication technologies can contribute to economic growth….Yet despite commend- able efforts and various initiatives, we are still very far from ensuring that the benefits of ICT are available to all. The digital divide is as wide as ever, with billions left unconnected.

Kofi Annan. [UNCTAD, 2002]